Botanical art workshop report from Twigs and things.

We have just finished the botanical art workshop and I thought I would get the pictures resulting from it, onto the blog before I started marking London Art College assignments.

From my perspective we had a very enjoyable workshop. But then I would say that wouldn’t I? Hopefully someone will confirm or deny this when they read the blog!

When painting a serious botanical subject that has gnarled branches with lichen or moss growing on it, I feel that I can play with the painting of it – as long as I stay true to the form, growth habit and type of lichen etc. I wanted to convey this to the group as well as get them to see the multitude of colours within such a specimen. I had two days to do this. Half of the group worked with watercolour and half with coloured pencil. Therefore it was exciting demonstrating the same topic in each of the media.

On one occasion I showed the group how to paint the furry terminal bud of a Magnolia soulangeana, first in watercolour and then in coloured pencil. It was quite amusing to hear the comments and the competition in assessing which bud looked best and which medium best suited that topic.

I was very glad to see that there were quite a few different types of lovely specimens which excited the group in different ways. There were some lovely colours observed, hidden in nooks and crannies. Red, pink, blues, oranges etc. A touch of some of these fresh colours, lifted a picture without dominating it. Anyway, I hope that you enjoy the following pictures.

The next botanical art workshop is Floating Hellebores (exposed faces), 27 February to 1 March. We already have a lot of Hellebores flowering in the garden, from very pale to very dark. There are available places, so do get in touch and book.

The brave class
The brave class
A piece of bark with several lichen types growing on it. The main one is identified as Cladonia cornuta.
A piece of bark with several lichen types growing on it. The main one is identified as Cladonia cornuta.
IMG_2089
At work
Gnarled birch branch with a variety of lichen forms. Watercolour.
Gnarled birch branch with a variety of lichen forms. Watercolour.
A branch of Magnolia stellata in watercolour.
A branch of Magnolia stellata in watercolour.
A variety of types of licjhen and moss on another branch from a Magnolia stellata tree. Coloured pencil.
A variety of types of licjhen and moss on another branch from a Magnolia stellata tree. Coloured pencil.
Start of a very complicated piece of work in Coloured pencil. The difficulty of portraying Cladonia cornuta amongst the other lichen growing on the bark piece. Quite a challenge.
Start of a very complicated piece of work in Coloured pencil. The difficulty of portraying Cladonia cornuta amongst the other lichen growing on the bark piece. Quite a challenge.
Rosehips in Watercolour
Rosehips in Watercolour
Both Birch twig and bark from a tree, with small amounts of lichen growing on it. Coloured pencil
Both Birch twig and bark from a tree, with small amounts of lichen growing on it. Coloured pencil
Branch with lichen very happily in situ. Watercolour
Branch with lichen very happily in situ. Watercolour
Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Botanical art workshop report from Twigs and things.

Please leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s